Archive for the ‘Lonestar College’ category

2014 Distance C# Development Classes

January 1, 2014

Once again Lonestar College will be offering distance-only C# development classes in the Spring of 2014.

Classes to be taught this semester are:

Introduction to C# (COSC1420) The course will instruct the student to basic programming constructs using C# and Microsoft Visual Studio 2012 / 2013. The student will learn the basics of the C# language and develop a basic Windows application. Language, Class, and Object fundamentals will be taught. A brief introduction to database interfaces may be included.

Advanced C# (ITSE 1492) The course will instruct the student to advanced programming constructs using C# and Microsoft Visual Studio 2012 / 2013. Successful course completion will require the development of a deployed Windows application (including the creation of a setup file). Other topics include multi-threading, user-controls, reflection, SQL and ADO (introductory), event handling, and Office 2007 Look and Feel.

Web Applications (ITSE 2472) The course will instruct the student in the development of a simple Web Application using an array of web application tools: HTML, CSS, JavaScript, C#, and SQL. Successful course completion will require the development of an Internet (Browser-based) application including rudimentary SQL interfaces.

Contact me at Mark.E.Reynolds@Lonestar.edu for additional information. Or visit my college blog at http://lonestar.edu/blogs/markreynolds.

(If you have not had all of the prerequisites for a course, contact me and we will discuss your options. Or you may contact counselor Erma Walker at Erma.M.Walker@Lonestar.edu.)

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Penny Rounding Problem

February 10, 2012

A computer rounding problem that I like to call “The Penny Rounding Problem” has been around for many, many years. At least two movies have been made with this problem a core element: The Office, and Superman III. The basic problem is that a column of numbers should add up to the total at the bottom. But they do not.

Mark Reynolds is currently at Southwestern Energy where he works in the Fayetteville Shale Drilling group as a Staff Drilling Data Analyst. In this position, he pulls his experiences in data processing, data analysis, and data presentation to improve Southwestern Energy’s work in the natural gas production and mid-stream market.

Recently, Mark has been working toward improved data collection, retention, and utilization in the real-time drilling environment.

www.ProfReynolds.com

For example: 1/3 is represented as .33, or even .333. But if you add .33 together 3 times, you get .99, not 1.00 – a penny off. This is why your final mortgage payment (if you ever actually paid it off) is never exactly the same as the monthly amount. Even worse, take 2/3 or .67. Multiple .66666… by 3 and you get 2.00; multiply .67 by 3 and you get 2.01.

Solving the problem is relatively simple, but requires diligence. Individual calculations must be individually rounded to the correct number of decimal places.

When I teach Excel at the college, I require the student to explicitly ROUND the answer to any mathematical operation involving

  1. possible sub-penny answers (divide by three, multiply by .0475, etc.)
  2. currency
  3. down-stream use of the answer.

Taken individually — addition of two numbers will never generate sub-penny digits, non-currency measurements (weight, speed, etc) do not bother people when the totals are off by small decimal fractions, and if the result to the mathematical calculation is never to be used then no one cares.

So when an interest equation is entered into Excel
= A3 * A4 / 12,
you should change it to be
= ROUND( A3 * A4 / 12, 2 ) so that the answer is rounded to 2 decimal places.

So can Richard Pryor get rich by taking all of the rounded, fractional pennies and putting them in his account? This is called Salami Slicing and snopes calls it a legend. But do gas stations do it with your pump price? read here for the answer

Online C# .NET Course Offerings

January 5, 2011

The Spring semester will begin in a couple of weeks – Tuesday, January 18. Lonestar College, Montgomery is offering several online software development courses.

Introduction to C# (COSC1420)
The course will instruct the student to basic programming constructs using C# and Microsoft Visual Studio 2008*. The student will learn the basics of the C# language and develop a basic Windows application. Language, Class, and Object fundamentals will be taught. A brief introduction to database interfaces may be included.

Advanced C# (ITSE 1492)
The course will instruct the student to advanced programming constructs using C# and Microsoft Visual Studio 2008*. Successful course completion will require the development of a deployed Windows application (including the creation of a setup file). Other topics include multi-threading, user-controls, reflection, SQL and ADO (introductory), event handling, and Office 2007 Look and Feel.

Web Applications (ITSE 2472)
The course will instruct the student in the development of a simple Web Application using an array of web application tools: HTML, CSS, JavaScript, C#, and SQL. Successful course completion will require the development of an Internet (Browser-based) application including rudimentary SQL interfaces.

IMED 1316 – Web Design I
Introduction to website design and deployment with special attention to overall creativity uniformity. (Microsoft Expressions is used for application development this course.)

Visit my college blog at http://lonestar.edu/blogs/markreynolds. Or you may contact counselor Erma Walker at Erma.M.Walker@Lonestar.edu.

2011 Spring Classes at Lonestar College

December 30, 2010

The Spring 2011 session begins in a couple weeks! Classes to be taught this semester are:

Introduction to C# (COSC1420)
The course will instruct the student to basic programming constructs using C# and Microsoft Visual Studio 2008*. The student will learn the basics of the C# language and develop a basic Windows application. Language, Class, and Object fundamentals will be taught. A brief introduction to database interfaces may be included.

Advanced C# (ITSE 1492)
The course will instruct the student to advanced programming constructs using C# and Microsoft Visual Studio 2008*. Successful course completion will require the development of a deployed Windows application (including the creation of a setup file). Other topics include multi-threading, user-controls, reflection, SQL and ADO (introductory), event handling, and Office 2007 Look and Feel.

Web Applications (ITSE 2472)
The course will instruct the student in the development of a simple Web Application using an array of web application tools: HTML, CSS, JavaScript, C#, and SQL. Successful course completion will require the development of an Internet (Browser-based) application including rudimentary SQL interfaces.

IMED 1316 – Web Design I
Introduction to website design and deployment with special attention to overall creativity uniformity. (Microsoft Expressions is used for application development this course.)

Contact me at Mark.E.Reynolds@Lonestar.edu for additional information. Or visit my college blog at http://lonestar.edu/blogs/markreynolds.

(If you have not had all of the prerequisites for a course, contact me and we will discuss your options. Or you may contact counselor Erma Walker at Erma.M.Walker@Lonestar.edu.)


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