Archive for the ‘web 2.0’ category

2014 Distance C# Development Classes

January 1, 2014

Once again Lonestar College will be offering distance-only C# development classes in the Spring of 2014.

Classes to be taught this semester are:

Introduction to C# (COSC1420) The course will instruct the student to basic programming constructs using C# and Microsoft Visual Studio 2012 / 2013. The student will learn the basics of the C# language and develop a basic Windows application. Language, Class, and Object fundamentals will be taught. A brief introduction to database interfaces may be included.

Advanced C# (ITSE 1492) The course will instruct the student to advanced programming constructs using C# and Microsoft Visual Studio 2012 / 2013. Successful course completion will require the development of a deployed Windows application (including the creation of a setup file). Other topics include multi-threading, user-controls, reflection, SQL and ADO (introductory), event handling, and Office 2007 Look and Feel.

Web Applications (ITSE 2472) The course will instruct the student in the development of a simple Web Application using an array of web application tools: HTML, CSS, JavaScript, C#, and SQL. Successful course completion will require the development of an Internet (Browser-based) application including rudimentary SQL interfaces.

Contact me at Mark.E.Reynolds@Lonestar.edu for additional information. Or visit my college blog at http://lonestar.edu/blogs/markreynolds.

(If you have not had all of the prerequisites for a course, contact me and we will discuss your options. Or you may contact counselor Erma Walker at Erma.M.Walker@Lonestar.edu.)

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Wikipedia turns 10

January 12, 2011

On January 15, Wikipedia will turn 10. Yes, 10 years old!

Looking back over time, the search engine game has been one of the the most rapid evolutions on the internet.

Gopher dates back to the earliest days of the internet. Primarily a text-base (command line) interface, it severed well when academia was the primary beneficiary and searching scholarly papers was the intention.

Closely related early search engines were named Archie, Jughead, and Veronica. Archie is generally considered to be the earliest search engine focusing on FTP hosted files.

During the mid-to-late 1990s, Infoseek was a popular service. It was bought by the Walt Disney company and eventually became the Go.Com search engine. Later in the 1990s, Ask Jeeves was extremely popular with people posting actual questions – and the answers tended to be accurate!

Web 2.0 has both consolidated the search engines and fragmented the information on the web. Google remains the most popular search engine followed by Yahoo and Bing.


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